UK driving test 2015-16 Top 10 reasons for failing practical test.

This data set comes from information held by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA).

This information isn’t classed as an “official statistic”. This means it’s not subject to scrutiny and assessment by the UK Statistics Authority.

Year 2015/16 Pass rate – 47.0% Tests passed with 0 faults – 14634

Top ten reasons for failing practical driving car test.

Junctions including roundabouts

The examiner would have looked for correct use of the Mirror – Signal – Manoeuvre (MSM) procedure.

The examiner was also looking for correct positioning and approach speed at junctions and roundabouts. This is because these skills are essential for dealing with these hazards safely. Turning right across busy roads/dual carriageways is particularly dangerous.

To drive safely and pass your test you must be confident that you can judge the speed and distance of oncoming traffic safely. You also need to look out for other road users emerging and turning at junctions and be ready to alter your course or stop.

Be extra watchful in poor light or bad weather conditions for the more vulnerable road user, such as cyclists and motorcyclists.

Use of mirrors – rear observation.

You should have used the mirrors safely and effectively acting correctly upon what you saw. Where mirrors are not enough, for example to cover ‘blind spots’, then you must take effective rear observation. You must always check this carefully before signalling, changing direction or changing speed.

You needed to demonstrate you can use the Mirror – Signal – Manoeuvre (MSM) routine effectively.

Control.

Throughout the test you needed to show you can use all the controls smoothly and at the correct time. This means less wear and tear on your vehicle and a smoother ride for your passengers.

The examiner was also looking for correct positioning and approach speed at junctions and roundabouts. This is because these skills are essential for dealing with these hazards safely. Positioning correctly when turning right across busy roads/dual carriageways is particularly dangerous.

Positioning

You should have positioned your car in a safe position; normally this would be keeping well to the left of the road.

You needed to keep clear of parked vehicles and be positioned correctly for the direction that you intend to take. You needed to look for and be guided by road signs and markings.

Other road users may judge your intentions by where you are positioned so be aware of where you are at all times.

 Move off.

You needed to show that you can move away on the level, on a slope and at an angle safely, under full control, taking effective observation. Move off only when it is safe to do so.

14. Use 

Throughout the test you needed to show you can use all the controls smoothly and at the correct time. This means less wear and tear on your vehicle and a smoother ride for your passengers.

 

Response to signs and signals.

You needed to show that you can react correctly to all traffic signs, road markings, traffic lights and pedestrian crossings.

You should have obeyed signals given by police officers, traffic wardens, Highways Agency officers and school crossing patrols.

You should watch out for signals given by other road users and carry on only when you are happy it is safe.

 

Reversing exercises.

Depending on the test you took, you may have been asked to complete one or more slow-speed manoeuvring exercises. You needed to show you were able to keep control of your vehicle.

This needed to be done whilst taking effective observations and acting correctly on what you see.

You should have given parked vehicles and other obstructions enough space to pass safely. You needed to watch out for changing situations such as pedestrians walking out from between parked cars, doors opening and vehicles trying to move off.

You should have been prepared to slow down or stop if needed.

 

 

 

 Response to signals (road markings)

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